February 22, 2017

"Rural Hours" Along the Lake with Susan Fenimore Cooper!

The Lindenwood Pet Squirrel!
Oft' times in old portraits a pet squirrel can be seen.
Lydia Lindenwood has a treat for her sister Pigeon Lindenwood's pet squirrel.


A squirrel atop the finial of the Turret at Castle Corgyncombe.




"Long walk of several miles on the lake.  We enjoyed the walk very much; it is particularly pleasant to wander about at will over so broad a field, confined to no track, and without an obstacle to arrest one's progress, all which gives a freedom to these walks upon the lake, beyond what we are accustomed to on terra firma, where roads, and fences, and bridges must be consulted at every turn."
~ "Rural Hours", published 1850,
by Susan Fenimore Cooper

During the Revolutionary War my 5th great grandfather William Scott came down the lake.
 


 


Lovely Isabelle Lindenwood and her delightful friend similarly frocked.


"Our winters are undoubtedly cold enough, but the weather is far from being always severe. We have many moderate days, and others, even in the heart of winter, which are soft and balmy, a warm wind blowing in your face from the south until you wonder how it could have found its way over the snow without being chilled. People always exclaim that such days are quite extraordinary, but in truth, there never passes a year without much weather that is unseasonably pleasant, if we would but remember it. And if we take the year throughout, this sort of weather, in all its varieties, will probably be found more favorably divided for us than we fancy. "
~ "Rural Hours", published 1850,
by Susan Fenimore Cooper


"It is St. Valentine's day, and valentines by the thousand are passing through the post-offices all over the country. Within the last few years, the number of these letters is said to have become really astonishing; we heard that 20,000 passed through the New York post-office last year, but one cannot vouch for the precise number."
~ "Rural Hours", published 1850,
by Susan Fenimore Cooper




Falling snowflakes.
 
Lydia Lindenwood with her younger sister Serendipity and their baby sister.


The grand hotel at the edge of the lake where I took dance lessons.


The Queen Anne English wooden dolls were made by talented dollmaker Kathy Patterson.


Lydia Lindenwood's younger sister Pigeon Lindenwood.
She loves animals and birds!
She is awaiting her new frock to be finished.
Pigeon also loves dance lessons!





"Fine day. The good people are beginning to use the lake for sleighs: it is now crossed by several roads, running in different directions."
"The broad, level field of white looks beautifully just now."
"During the last week in February, and in March, the lake is generally more used for sleighing than at any other period; we have seen heavily-loaded sleds, carrying stone and iron, passing over it at such times. The stage-sleighs, with four horses and eight or ten passengers, perhaps, occasionally go and come over the ice at that season. Our people are sometimes very daring in this way; they seldom leave the lake until some horse or sled has been lost; but happily, although there have been narrow escapes of this kind, no lives have yet been lost. "
~ "Rural Hours", published 1850,
by Susan Fenimore Cooper

How unfortunate and sad that some horses were lost to the weakened ice.

When the roads became muddy during thaws the lake was preferred to sleigh on.


"Pleasant morning in the woods. Much amused by squirrels...
Presently a beautiful red squirrel made his appearance, in the notch of a tall old pine, perhaps fifty feet from the ground. He paused every few steps to utter the peculiar cry which has given them the name of chickaree, for they often repeat it, and are noisy little creatures.  He came deliberately down the whole length of the trunk, chatting and waving his beautiful tail as he moved along. After leaving the tree he played about,  here and there, apparently in quest of nuts, and he frequently came very near us of his own accord."
~ "Rural Hours", published 1850,
by Susan Fenimore Cooper








Pigeon Lindenwood loves her pet squirrel!




Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

Please do not "Pin" our photographs.

Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2017/02/rural-hours-along-lake-with-susan.html
copyright © 2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

February 15, 2017

Valentine Woven Hearts!

A Heart Pocket Full of Posies!
Emma weaving a pocket heart.





The Herbary at Corgyncombe.
Clove orange pomanders, a tussie mussie, lavender wands, cochineal, and lavender.


Bleeding heart in the snow.


Herbs are hanging to dry at the Corgyncombe Herbary.


Emma and her little twins are all Izannah Walker inspired dolls.


A heart pocket full of posies!


I have been making cards using my own photographs, watercolours, and calligraphy for years for family and friends. Our dolls at Corgyncombe do the same! The quill pen is one of Phidelia Finch's feathers.


Emma and her "Little Dear One".

Tillie Tinkham and the sewing bird.






Several years ago, Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse at Corgyncombe, started "Tillie Tinkham's Sewing Circle" to teach the Hitty dolls to sew.
The Sewing Bird holds a tiny woven heart that Sarah made. The little heart can be used as a pocket purse to carry things, perhaps buttons, flowers, or little notes.




At Corgyncombe's Finch Post, Chirpy Cheerful holds one of the official Valentine Dolly Cards.



The robin is flying for Finch Post.
Finch Post serves the dolls at Corgyncombe with superb mail delivery service. My daughter Sarah and I were inspired by Tasha Tudor to have our own doll Post. Tasha Tudor's post was named Sparrow Post, where cards and goodies were delivered to her children. Tasha Tudor featured Sparrow Post in her books "All for Love" and "A Time to Keep".


"The Mary Frances Sewing Book, or Adventures Among the Thimble People" published in 1913, written by Jane Eayre Fryer and illustrated by Jane Allen Boyer.

A Valentine featuring my photograph of my daughter Sarah that we gave to Tasha Tudor.

My daughter Sarah and I sent our own handmade Valentines to Tasha Tudor for Valentine's Day. Here is the end of a letter where Tasha Tudor thanked us for the Valentine package. She wrote: "Thank you endlessly for the best Valentine ever. Gratefully, Tasha". Wow, we considered that quite a compliment from someone who has made so many delightful Valentines!

Violet's mittens keep her hands warm as she goes out and about in the cold and snowy outdoors. Violet's antique mittens have pretty pom-poms attached. Carrying a basket of Finch Post mail, Violet has stopped at the Finch Post box.


Elizabeth holds a woven heart that was featured in our 2008 Valentine Calendar.


Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

We enjoy our Regency Ballroom CD.
Here is a link to where you can purchase one:
The Regency Ballroom CD
with Music from Jane Austen's time



Please do not "Pin" our photographs.

Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2017/02/valentine-woven-hearts.html
copyright © 2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

January 8, 2017

St. Distaff's Day!

My Love of Spinning Part One!
My antique Christmas spinning wheel, that arrived in a crate a while before Christmas.
It is a joy to spin on!

For me, St. Distaff's Day, January 7th, usually is a joyous occasion, many times celebrated with friends, sometimes we bring a dish to pass!


Some Dundee cake saved for St. Distaff's Day tea.


One year, I took my distaff and hatchel to a pleasant gathering and demonstrated and spun flax that day.
Later, when I went out to my vehicle, alas and alack, I saw that my vehicle had been crashed into.
It wasn't very pleasant, it sort of put a dent in the day!
However, when the police were called and upon asking around the neighborhood, they found a witness who saw the person hit my vehicle and the person had left without confessing. This was a business vehicle that was doing business in the area. Fortunately, he was found out.


I put the flax stricks through different size hatchels a few more times to ensure the best line fiber.


A portion of a letter I wrote to Kristen in January 2005:
"I spin flax and I just love it. To dress the distaff I wet the distaff a little. I hold the distaff over the flax that I have laid out on a table and as I turn the distaff the flax fibers start to cling to it and I just keep winding it on until it is full. I hang a little cup of water on the spinning wheel and I keep moistening my fingers as I draw the fibers down. To me it seems so graceful to spin flax."
I have also made a distaff out of a branch of a tree.


On a delightful Autumnal trip, I acquired this beautiful antique Shaker spinning wheel! She retained the name that she was found with... Ann Lee. As with the Autumnal day on which she was discovered, doesn't she have a nice mellow glow?
My spun fiber can be seen from the orifice of the spinning wheel's flyer, leading up to the unspun fibers of the distaff.

Tasha Tudor and I always had a grand time discussing fibers and spinning.

My daughter Sarah and I descend from generations of spinners and shepherds. My 5th great grandmother was Martha Lyon May, wife of Eliakim May. Sarah and I have inherited a natural ability for turning fiber into thread. "The Lyon Memorial, Massachusetts Families" says: "The Hartford Courant, Jan. 6, 1766, had this item: Miss Levina Lyon, daughter of Capt. Nehemiah Lyon of Woodstock, and Miss Molly Ledoit carded and spun in one day 22 skeins of good tow yarn and a few days after, Martha Lyon, sister of Levina, spun 194 knots of good linen yarn in one day."
Some of my handspun linen thread which has multiple uses at Corgyncombe Cottage.


At age five my daughter Sarah started spinning wool on a drop spindle.


My handspun yarn, spun and plied into a very fine two-ply yarn.


I spun silk on the charkha spindle. The charkha is a delight to spin on! My two-ply silk twist is in the upper compartment. I named my Attaché charkha Content.

My handspun two-ply silk twist. It has such a lovely luster!


Cotton to be spun on my Charkha.

Below is one of my Charkhas. I also have a Journey Wheel. What a joy they are to spin on!


Spinning cotton on my book charkha I named Comfort.


Measuring my handspun two ply cotton on the skeinwinder on my Attaché charkha.
Each time around is one yard.


 Spinning a fine cotton thread on my book charkha Content.


For St. Distaff's Day I posted back in 2005 on an online group the following post:

January 2005
Subject: St. Distaff's Day
Greetings All,

Yesterday was St. Distaff's Day. I spun into the late hours. Traditionally St. Distaff's Day was the day when spinners returned to their work at the wheel after the Christmas festivities. I just love to spin, knit, and weave. I spin wool, flax, angora rabbit, mohair, llama, alpaca, silk, cat, corgi, and anything else I can get my hands on. I'm learning to spin a very fine thread of cotton. It's so different from spinning the rest of the fibers.

We hope all the spinners on the list have also returned to their wheels. We strongly encourage those who have not learned to spin to give it a try as it is one of the most pleasurable and satisfying of activities!

Take care,
Diane and daughter Sarah

 I was dismayed and disgusted to find that a person (I shall call this person "troll") had copied my "St. Distaff's Day" post almost word for word, put it on her blog, and claimed it as her own. It was like she was making believe she was me, in a strange and creepy way.  She was nasty when we asked her to remove it.

She has never apologized or asked forgiveness.

My  "St. Distaff's Day" post was all about my life, my own personal spinning experience.

The "troll" took my "St. Distaff's Day" post almost word for word and put it on her blog, and claimed it as her own, saying it was an entry from her own journal, also saying she had changed the words slightly to be readable by the public.  I feel that actually she had copied my post and changed it only slightly so that people would think my words, and therefore my life, was hers.

"Troll" mused about what her children would think about *her* based on her journals, after she was dead. What would her children think about her based on her journal post that was nearly word for word my writing and my life? Since it felt like she was taking on my life as hers, I felt even more uncomfortable that she was also talking about this after-death-aspect. It seemed so very creepy to me.

There was another blogger, I shall call her "Ruby".  The "troll" had also copied this other blogger "Ruby's" post, nearly word for word, put it on her blog, and claimed it as her own, it seemed like she was taking on "Ruby's" life, changing "Ruby's" children to her children in the copied post. (I was not amongst the first to let "Ruby" know that "troll" had copied her.) The "troll" who copied "Ruby's" post was the same "troll" who *later* copied my "St. Distaff's Day" post.

In what seems to me the oddest twist, "troll" had even gone as far as to show up, in person, to see "Ruby" right after "troll" took "Ruby's" post from "Ruby's"  blog. "Troll" had copied "Ruby's" post nearly word for word, put it on her blog, and claimed it as her own, it seemed like she was taking on "Ruby's" life.

In my opinion, that seems bizarre but not only did "troll" show up in person to see "Ruby"...

"Ruby" wrote to me in a letter that during their in person meeting, "troll" brought up the subject of "Ruby's" blog, saying to "Ruby" how difficult having a blog in the public eye and dealing with people must be.

 "Troll" brought up to "Ruby" the difficulties of having a blog when she "troll" was causing problems?? To me, this seems an odd and twisted thing to do, under the circumstances!


By bringing this up, the subject of the difficulties that "Ruby" must have with having a public blog, when *she, the troll* was actually causing a problem by copying "Ruby's" blog nearly word for word, putting it on her blog and saying it was hers, seeming like she was taking on "Ruby's" life, it seems to me, in my opinion, "troll" was reveling in being able to watch "Ruby's" pain in person and being able to cause the pain herself but not admitting that she, "troll", had taken "Ruby's" post...

"Ruby" wrote to me in a letter about the "troll" who had copied her (the same troll who copied me). "Ruby" said it appeared that "troll" had copied several other popular bloggers (besides herself and me). "Ruby" also said that "troll", in her opinion, basically tried to become other people...


My fine cotton thread spun on a tahkli spindle.

As you can see, fiber and spinning are a big part of my life!


Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2017/01/st-distaffs-day.html

copyright © 2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~