July 7, 2015

Hitty and Friends Waving from the Fence at Old Sturbridge Village!

Hitty Celebrates Independence Day!
Ima, Tillie Tinkham the seamstress mouse for the dolls at Corgyncombe, and Hitty.
Tillie waves the flag from the fence at Old Sturbridge Village!


Nanny Nettie-Kin at Old Sturbridge Village.


A sudden gust of wind sent the flags waving at Old Sturbridge Village!

My 6th great grandfather Nehemiah Lyon represented the Woodstock, Connecticut area in the protest of the Stamp Act in 1765. Nehemiah Lyon's wife was Mehitabel (Child) Lyon. Hitty again says "That's my name, too! My nickname is Hitty, from Mehitabel!" There are many Mehitabels in our family!

We at the Corgyncombe Courant love how Tasha Tudor illustrates July in "Around The Year" and "A Time to Keep". Tasha shows picnics, flying and displaying the American flag, firecrackers, and fireworks. In "Around the Year" the page with the eagle, stars, and flags catches our eye!

Some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.




Here is a link to:
Old Sturbridge Village


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com



http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2015/07/hitty-and-friends-waving-from-fence-at.html
copyright © 2015 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

July 1, 2015

Gathering Forget-Me-Nots for Tasha Tudor Inspired Dolls' Fair!

Celebrating Tasha Tudor's 100th Birthday Year!
Ima gathering forget-me-nots for the 2015 Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not Fair.


"The Real Pretend"
My daughter Sarah of Corgyncombe was Tasha Tudor's model for the illustrations of the little girl Kathy in "The Real Pretend".


My photograph of Sarah that was used by Tasha Tudor to illustrate the cover of "The Real Pretend".

Tasha Tudor wrote to us:
"Both of you are daily in my thoughts as I work on "The Real Pretend", which is coming nicely. The long table is strewn with beguiling photographs of Sarah. How pleased I am to have her for a model."

The year 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of Tasha Tudor's birth in 1915!

Nanny Nettie-Kin reminds us of Tasha Tudor and we and the dolls and critters of Corgyncombe will be celebrating this, the 100th year since Tasha Tudor's birth!

Tasha Corgi amongst the forget-me-nots.


Ethlyn Corgi nicely poses on Forget-Me-Not Knoll.


Ethlyn Corgi back when she was a young, energetic pup rolling down Forget-Me-Not Knoll.
 
Tasha Corgi rolling down Forget-Me-Not Knoll.

While Ima gathers forget-me-nots for the Dolls' Fair, Tasha Corgi waits in the wheelbarrow.

Ima and Tasha Corgi stop by 863 Park Avenue.


Tasha Tudor's Rebecca Corgi and Sarah share a quiet moment on Tasha Tudor's back door stoop. Sarah tenderly patted Rebecca on the back and told her that she was most charming.
Amongst the plants along the way to the door are fuchsias, adorable Rebecca looks as if she has a fuchsia delicately hanging from the tip of her little corgi nose! In the doorway, one can see the warm and cozy glow coming from within Tasha Tudor's cottage.

Tasha Tudor wrote to us:
"Dear Diane and Sarah,
What a delightful tiny Surprise Box came the other day!! Rebecca and Owyn and I were all three very taken with the two mini-corgyn and their interesting booklets. How sweet of you to send them! Thank you many times over."

Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

Last year's Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not Fair 2014.
Nanny Nettie-Kin decided to have a Forget-Me-Not Fair to promote the delight and appreciation of her favorite flower, forget-me-nots! Tasha Tudor also loved forget-me-nots!

My daughter Sarah designed the fair booth and she and her father made it. Sarah, Tillie Tinkham the seamstress mouse at Corgyncombe, and Nanny Nettie-Kin made the tent cover. The decorative edge was made with our fancy trim cutter and the tent was sewn on an old hand-crank Singer sewing machine.


"Corgiville Fair" written and illustrated by Tasha Tudor.
What a delight the book is with the lovely, detailed paintings and the story where Tasha's wonderful sense of humor comes shining through. Our Bleuette dolls' Tasha Corgi stands in front. "Corgiville Fair" is amongst the all time favorites at the Corgyncombe Library. It is some of Tasha's best work!!! If you haven't seen "Corgiville Fair" you are missing out!

Nanny Nettie Kin's Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not seeds sold at a booth at the Annual Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not Fair.  Seeds to sow for a beauteous, bountiful sea of dainty forget-me-nots!


A Preview of the the 2015
Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not Fair:
Nanny Nettie-Kin has just finished hanging up some of the old fashioned doughnuts as they ready for the 2015 Forget-Me-Not Fair. Ima has brought Nanny a trug of forget-me-nots that she has gathered to fashion into bouquets for the booths at the Doll Fair.


A Preview of the the 2015
Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not Fair:
A Fair for the Furtherance of Forget-Me-Nots!

You will see more of the 2015 Corgyncombe Forget-Me-Not Fair as a Special Surprise as we get closer to Tasha Tudor's 100th Birthday Celebration!!!


 Here is a link to last year's 2014:
Forget-Me-Not Fair at Corgyncombe!
To Sow a Sea of Forget-Me-Nots!



Here is a link to:
A Flower Favoured by Nanny Nettie-Kin and Tasha Tudor!
Oh, the Delight of Forget-Me-Nots!


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com



http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2015/07/gathering-forget-me-nots-for-tasha.html
copyright © 2015 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

June 17, 2015

Hitty Visits the Quaker Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village!

To Be Most Content!
Hitty looks peaceful and content at the window in the Quaker Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village. Hitty likes to be called Hitty Content when she is wearing Quaker dress, as above.

Several of our ancestors were Quaker, including my 4th great grandmother who was named Content Hoag. Content was also (through a different family line of mine) my 4th great grandfather Abram Hoag's first cousin.

Hitty Content said "Thank thee, Tillie, for making me a Quaker outfit!"

Hitty's Quaker frock with pleats about the waist of the skirt and at the shoulders of the sleeves, her fichu, and cap were made by the talented little Tillie Tinkham, seamstress mouse for the dolls at Corgyncombe.  Tillie patterned the little ruffled cap after the "Cap for a Young Member of the Society of Friends" in "The Workwoman's Guide, By A Lady, A Guide to 19th Century Decorative Arts, Fashion and Practical Crafts, 1838".

In referencing bunnies and knitted rabbit wool items from Beatrix Potter's stories and a knitting pattern, Tasha Tudor mentioned "The Workwoman's Guide". Tasha Tudor wrote to us:



"You must have read Sarah 'The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies.' Remember they gave Mrs. Tittlemouse enough rabbit wool to knit several pairs of muffatees?! 'The Workwoman's Guide' has directions. Maybe you also own this invaluable work?"

We at Corgyncombe find that "The Workwoman's Guide" is indeed a most valuable guide. It contains information, patterns, and instructions relating to bonnets and caps, collars, stitches, shawls, frocks, sleeves, knitting, household items, and many other things. The book has instructions for making little stitches and "neat" and "neatly" are predominant words.

Tillie Tinkham is in agreement with Tasha Tudor: "The Workwoman's Guide" is an "invaluable work"!

The year 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of Tasha Tudor's birth in 1915!

Nanny Nettie-Kin reminds us of Tasha Tudor and we and the dolls and critters of Corgyncombe will be celebrating this, the 100th year since Tasha Tudor's birth!

Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.


The Quaker Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village


Inside the Quaker Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village.
The women sat on one side in the Friends' Meetinghouse and the men sat on the other.



My Grandmum and Grandfather were both of early New England Quaker descent. Both of their families started out in Massachusetts, north of Boston in the Newbury area and south of Boston in the Dartmouth area. Their Quaker families, known as the Society of Friends, then settled in an area known as the Oblong.

The Oblong was a long, narrow strip of land whose ownership was disputed between Connecticut and New York. In this long, narrow strip, my Quaker families settled and lived.

"The History of Dutchess County, New York" edited by Frank Hasbrouck, published 1909, says the following: "The Oblong Patent, covering a narrow strip along the east borders of Dutchess, Putnam and Westchester counties, was ceded to the State of New York by Connecticut, May 14, 1731."


Inside the Friends' Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village.


May apple blossoms at sunrise down near Corgi Creek.

Tasha Tudor was inspired by the movie "Friendly Persuasion" to illustrate the endpapers of "Around the Year". The endpapers of "Around the Year" show a couple riding in a horse and buggy, crossing a creek, with lovely countryside round with sheep and cows to pasture.


The Quaker Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village.

The movie "Friendly Persuasion" was about a Quaker family amidst the Civil War. The movie's introduction song is so lovely accompanying this post.




Looking down from upstairs in the Friends' Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village.

In the book "Hitty, Her First Hundred Years" by Rachel Field, the original Hitty finds herself living with a Quaker family with a little girl named Clarissa Pryce.  After Clarissa found Hitty's name had been cross-stitched on her chemise she told her: "Thee must have been thought highly of, Hitty, to wear coral beads and thy name in cross-stitch, too." Clarissa sewed a Quaker frock, fichu and cap for Hitty and said "Now she looks like a true Friend". In the book, the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier visited the Pryce family and met Hitty. He was pleased Hitty was in Quaker dress and he wrote a poem about Hitty that appears in Rachel Field's book "Hitty, Her First Hundred Years":

"These verses are in praise of thee,
Thou finger's length of modesty,
Whose tranquil brow and dress of gray
Become thee more than bright array."

The time that Hitty spends with Clarissa Pryce is our favorite part of the book "Hitty, Her First Hundred Years".


The Quaker Meetinghouse at Old Sturbridge Village.

We have the featured antique caps and "The Workwoman's Guide" before at the Corgyncombe Courant.
Here is a link to:

Here is a link to another post featuring our Quaker ancestors at the Corgyncombe Courant:
A Carriage Ride Along Corgi Creek!
May Day Delights!


Here are links to our previous posts in the series of
"Hitty's Journey and Adventures
at Old Sturbridge Village"
at the
Corgyncombe Courant:


Hitty Visits Old Sturbridge Village, Freeman Farm!

At Old Sturbridge Village Hitty Finds George Washington!

Hitty, Tasha Tudor Birthday Celebration,



Here is a link to:
Old Sturbridge Village



Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com



http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2015/06/hitty-visits-quaker-meetinghouse-at-old.html
copyright © 2015 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

May 27, 2015

Hitty Visits the Shoemaker at Old Sturbridge Village!

Finding a Place to Rest Your Pegs!
At Old Sturbridge Village, Hitty was delighted to visit with the shoemaker.


The shoe shop at Old Sturbridge Village, that reminds of us Tasha Tudor's illustration in "The Real Pretend" of Kathy and her brother setting out to collect the money for the Larkin goods they sold. My daughter Sarah was the model for the illustrations of the little girl Kathy in "The Real Pretend".


Shoes on display in the shoe shop.
Several in our Moulton family were shoemakers in the early 1800s from Brimfield, Massachusetts, not far from Sturbridge.


Hitty Rachel and the shoemaker at Old Sturbridge Village.




Hitty was very interested in the wooden pegs used in making the shoes as she, too, is jointed with pegs.


The Freeman farm at Old Sturbridge Village is where Pliny Freeman and his wife Delia lived. Their daughter Delia married our second cousin John May. John May, Delia, and their children lived with Delia's parents at the Freeman Farm in the late 1830s. During this time John May worked at making shoes.






The shoemaker works at the low bench with his tools at hand.






After much walking around Hitty's pegs began to feel tired. She spied this little bed just her size!


Hitty sees that the little bed is already occupied by a little doll who is also in need of a rest. The little doll sort of resembled a Hitty but was not made of wood. Hitty Rachel loved her frock and pinafore!


Hitty found another little bed in the Salem Towne House. She thought that would be the perfect place for her to rest her pegs!

Ima resting at the Towne House garden.
Hitty and Ima were made by talented doll carver Judy Brown.


An antique doll bed on display at Old Sturbridge Village.


When Hitty saw this little doll cradle on display she thought of the book "Hitty, Her First Hundred Years" by Rachel Field and how the original Hitty had her own cradle. Hitty's cradle was made by Phoebe's father Captain Preble and she enjoyed recuperating in it after her trying time in the crow's nest in the "ancestral pine" that stood alongside the Preble house.

"Look," said Hitty, "what a beautiful coach to take an old fashioned ride in!"


The Hartford & Worcester stagecoach at Old Sturbridge Village.
Hitty thought of the original Hitty riding in a coach. In "Hitty, Her First Hundred Years" by Rachel Field, the Prebles and Hitty took the stagecoach from Portland, Maine to Portsmouth, New Hampshire to Salem, Massachusetts and on to Boston. The Captain was going to set sail on the ship Diana-Kate and it was decided that his family join him.




Hitty asks the driver of the stagecoach if she could see what it would be like to be in the driver's seat. The driver kindly agreed. Hitty felt that it was almost like being up in the ancestral pine as she was up so high!
Hitty took the reins for a moment but I was too startled at the thought of little Hitty driving the horses to snap a photograph!


Hitty felt like she could nearly touch the roof of the tavern!


Hitty thought a stagecoach ride can be a good way to rest your pegs!
Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com


http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2015/05/hitty-visits-shoemaker-at-old.html
copyright © 2015 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~