September 5, 2018

Lovely Jenny Wren Lindenwood Arrives by Carriage!

Tea in the Garden with Tillie Tinkham!
Jenny Wren Lindenwood driving her horse and carriage.
She has come a long way and will soon arrive at Corgyncombe.


A bouquet of asters and goldenrod, gathered along old country lanes.


The geese curtsied their greeting to Jenny Wren!


A rainbow appeared amongst the Corgyncombe hills and dales.


There are many delightful sights and sounds along the way.





 



 After a long journey, Jenny Wren Lindenwood and Molly the horse arrive at Corgyncombe Cottage.


The goldenrod is used at Corgyncombe for dyeing our handspun yarn.




Jenny Wren wears an exquisite frilled cap!


Sarah astride our Morgan horse Ben.

Sarah is wearing a sweater that I handspun, naturally dyed with goldenrod and knit.

Tasha Tudor always said that my daughter Sarah had lovely "corgi red" hair.
Jenny Wren Lindenwood has the same lovely shade of "corgi red".



A shawl that I am knitting with my handspun yarn, naturally dyed with goldenrod.
It is done in seed stitch as I prefer it to garter stitch. I find it more pleasing to the eye and more interesting to knit.




Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse at Corgyncombe, was delighted to hear that Jenny Wren Lindenwood specializes in making dolly frocks!

The Golden Thimble Society commenced as Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse at Corgyncombe for many years, wanted to assist the Queen Anne English Wooden dolls with their needlework.

Jenny Wren told Tillie that she would be very pleased to join the Golden Thimble Society!


Tillie tells Jenny Wren about her shoppe "Tillie Tinkham's Frock & Fashions" with Millinery and Tea Room in the four story Dolls House, 863 Park Avenue.





Jenny Wren Lindenwood joins her sister Pigeon Lindenwood, pictured above.

Both sisters have birdie names.  The name and term "Jenny Wren" has been in use for many years; a 1782 English Dictionary has an entry for Jenny-Wren, a fine Song-Bird. The phrase appears in traditonal children's stories. Charles Dickens used Jenny Wren as the name for one of his characters in "Our Mutual Friend" written in 1864-1865. She was the dolls' dressmaker.  Since then various authors have also used the name "Jenny Wren" in their stories, including Beatrix Potter, Thornton Burgess, and Tasha Tudor.

Jenny Wren Lindenwood, like her sister Pigeon, has a fondness for fowl.



Tillie says that Hannah and Edward have also been seen riding in the carriage around Corgyncombe Country and in the garden!


Tea with Welsh tea cakes and a bouquet of gathered goldenrod and asters.


Tillie Tinkham at the door of 863 Park Avenue.

Tillie Tinkham has a frock and millinery shop, "Tillie Tinkham's Frocks and Fashions", on the ground floor of the old dollhouse that came with the address 863 Park Avenue above the door. The little girl who originally owned it lived at 863 Park Avenue.

The Dibble Dabble Duck family, the Tweet Sweet Birdies, Miss Elsie Pricklish the Hedgehog, and the Hittys occupy the different floors of the old doll's house.


The dollhouse, with its two large opening doors, reminds us of Beatrix Potter's doll's house at Hill Top.




The real and original Tillie Tinkham, seamstress mouse for the dolls and critters at Corgyncombe.


Jenny Wren and Pigeon Lindenwood are Queen Anne English wooden dolls made by talented dollmaker Kathy Patterson.


Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.
 
Please do not "Pin" our photographs.
Please do not post our photographs on facebook.
 
Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.

Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2018/09/lovely-jenny-wren-lindenwood-arrives-by.html
copyright © 2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

August 1, 2018

Beatrix Potter Birthday Celebration!

Celebrating Lovely Kindred Interests!
Little Emma has brought her chair out into the garden and is showing the Little Dear One "The Tale of The Pie and the Patty-Pan" written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter.
Beatrix Potter's stories have delighted children for years with their lovely illustrations and charming tales.
 


In Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of The Pie and The Patty-Pan", Ribby, with a pitcher of milk and a plate of butter, is returning from the farm on a path crossing the pasture where the cows are grazing.


The cows at pasture with the lovely hillside landscape in the background.


 The book is open to Beatrix Potter's illustration of Ribby the Cat, with a pitcher of milk and a plate of butter, returning from the farm on a path crossing the pasture where the cows are grazing.
As Emma and the Little Dear One were admiring this picture, an unknown cat was seen running through the field.
Little Dear One said "That Kitty is not dressed as nicely as Ribby with her lovely frock and shawl." Emma said "That is not as 'genteel' a Kitty as Ribby." Emma remembers that in "The Tale of The Pie and The Patty-Pan" Ribby says that Duchess is "a most genteel and elegant little dog."


Beatrix Potter's Birthday Tea was held on her birthday, July 28th, near the mossy log down by the creek!
My daughter Sarah and I are admirers of Beatrix Potter and feel a kinship with her. We enjoyed teas, elevenishes and delightful conversations with Tasha Tudor. What fun it would have been to have had Beatrix Potter with us also... what we all together could have talked about... bunnies, gardens, ducks, old houses, old barns, hills and dales, and other aspects of country life and landscapes.

Most of my ancestors hailed from old England. Our English heritage is deeply ingrained in who we are and what we love!
In referencing bunnies and knitted rabbit wool items from Beatrix Potter's stories and a knitting pattern, Tasha Tudor mentioned "The Workwoman's Guide". Tasha Tudor wrote to us:
"You must have read Sarah 'The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies.' Remember they gave Mrs. Tittlemouse enough rabbit wool to knit several pairs of muffatees?! 'The Workwoman's Guide' has directions. Maybe you also own this invaluable work?"

We at Corgyncombe find that "The Workwoman's Guide" is indeed a most valuable guide. It contains information, patterns, and instructions relating to bonnets and caps, collars, stitches, shawls, frocks, sleeves, knitting, household items, and many other things. The book has instructions for making little stitches and "neat" and "neatly" are predominant words.

Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse for the dolls and critters at Corgyncombe, is in agreement with Tasha Tudor: "The Workwoman's Guide" is an "invaluable work"!


At the Corgyncombe Corg'ery, Lydia Corgi is the smallest of the Corgyn.
Our nickname for her is Bitty.
Lydia might be the smallest but she is the one with the biggest appetite!
Here she is hoping to receive a butter treat!
Lydia reminds us of the dog Duchess in Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of The Pie and The Patty-Pan".
Duchess was known for gulping down her food in a hasty manner, as does Lydia!
One day I bent down to pick up Bitty Liddy and as I picked her up she groaned as if she was quite uncomfortable. I said "Oh my, Bitty Liddy is stuffed full without room to spare!" Upon inspection of the food cupboard, the door was found open and it was clear that Bitty had indulged until she could indulge no more! Bitty's food was kept to a modest ration for the next few days with many necessary outings during her recovery!
In Beatrix Potter's illustrations Duchess's many expressions remind us of Bitty Liddy!


A Wren family has a nest house in the apple tree next to the mossy log.
 
 
I made a tussie mussie using larkspur, lavender, thyme, winter savory, rosemary, wild marjoram, rose geranium leaves, and baby's breath all gathered from the Corgyncombe Garden of Herbs.
The little mouse knitting is based upon Beatrix Potter's illustration of the "Old woman who lived in a shoe" in "Appley Dapply's Nursery Rhymes". It is one of our favorite Beatrix Potter illustrations! The little knitting mouse's cap reminds us of the white cap that Bridget likes to wear. "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" book on the table is a limited edition reproduction of Beatrix Potter's first privately printed Peter Rabbit book and has the original illustrations with Beatrix's own handwriting. The dust jacket is a reproduction of calico printed by Beatrix's grandfather's calico printworks. It is such a sweet book!


Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse at Corgyncombe, amongst the Johnny-jump-ups.
Whilst in the garden Tillie and Sarah conferred about frocks and fashions and the dolls at Corgyncombe.


Lovely hills and dales add such character to the landscape.
Ahhh, how we love the hills!
As the hills were to Beatrix Potter and Tasha Tudor,
the hills are a great inspiration to us.


Sarah going out into the garden.


Beatrix Potter cookies with Jemima Puddle-duck and Peter Rabbit with his Mum who is buttoning his little jacket.
The Beatrix Potter teapot shows Jeremy Fisher the frog fishing on a lily pad.
Alongside are figurines of Jemima Puddle-duck and Peter Rabbit.


The Beatrix Potter Hill Top blog said that Beatrix Potter always gathered a pink water lily and a white lily and brought them into the house to enjoy on her birthday.
Beatrix Potter illustrated beautiful water lilies in her book "The Tale of Tale of Jeremy Fisher".


The lovely and delicate pink Herb Robert.


A Rabbit amongst the Corgyncombe clover.


One thinks of Peter Rabbit hiding in the watering can...


In "The Tale of Peter Rabbit", Beatrix Potter illustrates Peter as he spies, and decides to avoid, a cat watching gold-fish swimming in a pond in Mr. McGregor's garden.
We used to have huge goldfish in our pond. When we fed them the water would just boil with goldfish excitement. The goldfish in the front with the red circle on her head was named Lucy. Inspired by Beatrix Potter we have added a photograph of our kitten as if he is peeking into the pond of goldfish delights. Alas, we think our goldfish became the meals of a hungry blue heron as they disappeared one by one. Our kitten has also been drawn by Tasha Tudor several times and appears on the cover of "The Real Pretend" in this pose and another pose as an older kitten.


At Corgyncombe there are lovely wild Columbines that come in white, pink, and purple-blue.


Humbelina the Hummingbird enjoys the peacefulness of my garden.


She tells me of the places she has been and what she has seen.




The old shepherd who had the flock of sheep in the above photograph lived to be 98 and for years kept sheep on the hillside a ways down the road from my ancestral family cemetery. The old shepherd was related to me through an old family line. The trees in the hillside beyond the pasture show lovely shades of violet, pink, and green.
Beatrix Potter loved sheep and raised Herdwick sheep, a different breed from the sheep pictured above.


My Garden of Herbs.


From the Corgyncombe Vegetable Garden, radishes gathered in a trug with some fresh cut spearmint on the red and white spotted handkerchief.
In Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Peter Rabbit", after eating lettuce and french beans, Peter Rabbit found some radishes and ate til he felt quite ill!
The red and white spotted handkerchief reminds us of Peter Rabbit's mum's red and white spotted handkerchief that was used by the little naughty bunnies, Peter Rabbit and Benjamin Bunny, to gather onions in Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Benjamin Bunny". The handkerchief is also seen in "The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle" as it has been laundered and folded by Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, who, alas, could not get the smell of onions out. Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle then delivered the handkerchief to the bunnies who were hiding amongst the ferns along the way and gladly received the laundered handkerchief.


Hush, is that Peter Rabbit at garden's edge?


Cabbage in the Corgyncombe Vegetable Garden.
Beatrix Potter's Peter Rabbit "lost one of his shoes among the cabbages".


Radishes from the Corgyncombe Vegetable Garden in a colander in the old grey stone sink.


A Swallowtail butterfly finding a nectar treat on the echinacea.
The garden is so fragrant with the smell of the echinacea.


Butterflies in the garden reminds us at the Corgyncombe Courant of Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Tom Kitten". As Mother Cat Tabitha was expecting company she had dressed her three kittens up in fine clothes. More preparations needed to be completed before her guests arrived so she let her kittens go out in the garden but warned them to be careful not to soil their clothing. There is an illustration of Tom Kitten dressed in a darling blue suit and straw hat amusing himself with a butterfly as it flits about the garden.





Pink foxgloves can be found in profusion as Jemima finds a nesting place at the home of the "foxy-whiskered gentleman" in Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Jemima Puddle-duck".

In Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle" there are foxgloves at the stile that Lucie crosses.


The teapot is one of my favorites and has Jemima Puddle-duck and, as Beatrix Potter said, the "foxy-whiskered gentleman" walking about discussing things of importance, such as nesting. The "foxy-whiskered gentleman" was all too interested! There are foxgloves on either side of the Jemima Puddle-duck and the "foxy-whiskered gentleman".


Cookies for tea.


As coincidence would have it, the same day we found our Beatrix Flopsy Bunny we also acquired a copy of Beatrix Potter's "The Story of A Fierce Bad Rabbit".
Above, little Beatrix Flopsy Bunny looks at the cover of Beatrix Potter's, "The Story of A Fierce Bad Rabbit". On the cover is the "Fierce Bad Rabbit" with the hunter in the background.


Corgyncombe Cottage acquired the sandstone sink in Connecticut where our ancestors, the Stanclift family, dwelt. In the above photograph I have a colander full of washed carrots from the Corgyncombe Vegetable Garden.
Gravestone carving was a tradition in the Stanclift family. The stone of the gravestones and the Corgyncombe Butt'ry sink are the same reddish brown sandstone. The sink, which was from a very old house in the area the Stanclifts lived, could well have been made by one of the Stanclifts.
Our Stanclift family came from Yorkshire, England in the 1680s.


Beatrix Flopsy Bunny is closely examining the "nice gentle Rabbit's" carrot and gets a better look at the big nasty "Fierce Bad Rabbit" who is bounding up in the background to steal away the "nice gentle Rabbit's" carrot.


Bouquet of daisies, forget-me-nots, buttercups, and clover in the Corgyncombe apothecary.


Columbine that grow wild at Corgyncombe.


Butterfly on echinacea.


Hens and Chicks at Corgyncombe.

 
 Wren on a mossy log.
 Jenny Wren's damask tablecloth was cleaned by Mrs. Tiggywinkle the laundress in Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-winkle". Jenny Wren is illustrated by Beatrix as she receives her clean tablecloth from Mrs. Tiggy-winkle.
Someone lives inside this mossy log at Corgyncombe but you will you have to wait til that tale is finished!


In late afternoon, on Beatrix Potter's birthday, a thunder shower meant that the tea party had to come indoors. After a bit the sun came out and a lovely rainbow appeared!


Tillie Tinkham waves from the Corgyncombe Garden of Herbs.


Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

Please do not "Pin" our photographs.
Please do not post our photographs on facebook.


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.
 
http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2018/08/beatrix-potter-birthday-celebration.html
copyright © 2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~