February 14, 2018

Gathering Strawberries and Flowers for One Another!

Hannah and Edward!
Hannah went out and gathered wild strawberries for her Edward.

"It was a pretty sight, coming home, to see the women and children scattered about the meadows, gathering wild strawberries. This delightful fruit is very abundant here, growing everywhere, in the woods, along the road-sides, and in every meadow."
~ "Rural Hours" by Susan Fenimore Cooper

Ah yes, what a beautiful sight this must have been indeed, with the ladies and children dressed in the good taste of the day!


Corgyncombe Wild Strawberries
"Both raspberries and strawberries grow wild here in such profusion that few persons cultivate them."
~ "Rural Hours" by Susan Fenimore Cooper




"Fine strawberries from the fields this evening for tea... Strolled in the lane, enjoying the fragrant meadows..."
~ "Rural Hours" by Susan Fenimore Cooper


Strawberries that grow wild about meadows and lawn at Corgyncombe.




"A meadow is a delicate embroidery in colors, which you must examine closely to understand all its merits; the nearer you are,  the better. One must bend over the grass to find the blue violet in May, the red strawberry in June; one should be close at  hand to mark the first appearance of the simple field-blossoms, clover, red and white, buttercup and daisy, with the later  lily, and primrose, and meadow-tuft; one should be nigh to breathe the sweet and fresh perfume, which increases daily until the  mowers come with their scythes."
~ "Rural Hours" by Susan Fenimore Cooper


Susan Fenimore Cooper wrote the book "Rural Hours" as a journal of her frequent nature walks out and about the countryside. It was published in 1850.


Edward surprised his Hannah with a bouquet of lavender and rose!


Hannah sits in a chair that Seth Tudor made, a miniature replica of one that Tasha Tudor sat in do her artwork.


Lovely landscapes and countryside!






David Austin Roses at Corgyncombe

"Just now we are eager to feast our eyes upon a rose - a true, perfect rose - with all her beauties opening to the light, all  her silken petals unfolding in rich profusion about her fragrant heart."
~ "Rural Hours" by Susan Fenimore Cooper


Susan Fenimore Cooper was the daughter of James Fenimore Cooper, author of the "Leatherstocking Tales".





Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

Please do not "Pin" our photographs.
Please do not post our photographs on facebook.


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2018/02/gathering-strawberries-and-flowers-for.html
copyright © 2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

February 12, 2018

Hannah Gathering Greens!

Tea and Corsages!
Hannah has been out and about gathering some greens and rose hips.
Hannah wears her warm lovely shawl that a dear friend of Tasha Tudor's and ours made for us.



Wearing her lovely apron that she and Tillie made.


Tillie Tinkham has been the seamstress mouse for the dolls and critters at Corgyncombe for many years.
Above, Tillie, with golden thimble, and Hannah are inspecting and admiring the gathers on Hannah's new pinafore.
The Golden Thimble Society commenced as Tillie wanted to assist the Queen Anne English Wooden dolls with their needlework.




Hannah sits in a chair that Seth Tudor made, a miniature replica of one that Tasha Tudor sat in do her artwork.




Hannah fashions winter corsages from the greens and rose hips.






Hannah and Edward have returned from a walk in the beautiful winter countryside!
They hold hands and contemplate a good spot of tea.


How tender and loving Edward is with his dear Hannah!




Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.


We enjoy our Regency Ballroom CD.
Here is a link to where you can purchase one:
The Regency Ballroom CD
with Music from Jane Austen's time

Please do not "Pin" our photographs.
Please do not post our photographs on facebook.

 

Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2018/02/hannah-gathering-greens.html
copyright © 2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

January 25, 2018

My Own Little Sewing Machine!

Sewing and Embroidery When I was 9 Years Old!
When I was nine years old, I received this sewing machine from my dear Grandmum on my father's side. I was thrilled, as I could sew all by myself and make dolly clothes!

Above, Hitty holds a glittery star above Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse for the dolls and critters at Corgyncombe. This Christmas I plugged my little machine in and she still works just fine!


My mother had my beautiful long blond hair that I loved chopped off.
I hated my new short, short haircut! It just was not me!
It was sooo cold in the wintertime having such a short, short haircut!

I am pictured above with my new ice skates and my Singer sewing machine.


Before my lovely curls were chopped!

Several years ago, I came across in a drawer of my cupboard, this apron that I made when I was nine years old. I washed it and hung it on the line to dry.

Every now and then my mother would would send for remnants in the mail, you never knew exactly what you would get. During Christmas vacation I cut out the apron from one of the pieces of fabric. I sewed the apron together on my little machine.


Iron-on transfers were used to mark the patterns of some of my favorite flowers!

I hand embroidered the tulip, daffodil and rose when I was nine years old.
I didn't quite finish, as one of my rose leaves was left undone.



I loved being outside skating and sledding but on the days that I couldn't go out I would work with my little sewing machine and my embroidery hoop, needle and floss.

I made aprons for both of my Grandmum's the next Christmas!

Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse at Corgyncombe, delighted in seeing my sewing machine and apron!








"The Mary Frances Sewing Book, or Adventures Among the Thimble People" published in 1913, written by Jane Eayre Fryer and illustrated by Jane Allen Boyer.

In the book Sewing Bird tells the little girl Mary Frances about the sewing lessons and all the things that she can make for her doll:

"Why, certainly, dear little Miss,
You can learn to make all this:
A pin-a-fore, some under-clothes,
A little 'kerchief for her nose;
Kimono, bloomers, little cap,
a nightie for her little nap;
A dress for morn, for afternoon,
A dress for parties, not too soon;
A little cape, a little bonnet --
perhaps with roses fastened on it; --
A nice warm coat to keep from chill,
A dainty sack, in case she's ill:
All this and more we'll gladly teach,
If you will do and follow each--
will you?"



Tillie Tinkham's Sewing Circle Emblem!
Tillie Tinkham on her rose tuffet with her golden metal thimble!



A lovely sewing bird holds Tillie's pins.
Sewing birds were used for hand sewing.


In "The Mary Frances Sewing Book" sewing bird's beak held your work whilst hemming and sewing. Working with the sewing bird allowed you to sit up straighter whilst sewing.

The Sewing Bird in
"The Mary Frances Sewing Book" sings:


"I love to sit
And sing and sing --
But lesson time
Is on the wing:
Miss Never-Try
Never can-do;
Miss Never-Begin
Never gets thru."


I have fond remembrances of visiting a favorite elderly relative. My great grandmum's cousin Lena (who was more the age of my Grandmum) excelled at domestic skills such as pickling, breadmaking, sewing, and many others. She always won prizes for her domestic abilities at the county fair. My family used to visit them often and I would usually take a doll with me. One time she surprised me with a handmade dolly wardrobe in an old basket.

Lena had a sewing bird. I remember her sewing bird clamped on a table near her sewing machine. She was a professional seamstress and had her sewing shop in her house. Her sewing machine was in her bright cheerful yellow kitchen near an old fashioned bay window. In the window she had all kinds of plants and a canary that sang.

In "The Mary Frances Sewing Book" there is also a canary who lives in the sewing room.



Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

Please do not "Pin" our photographs.
Please do not post our photographs on facebook.


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.

http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2018/01/my-own-little-sewing-machine.html
copyright © 2018 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

December 27, 2017

Clove Orange Pomanders!

Christmas Time Traditions!
'Tis now the season when we make apple, orange, lemon, and lime pomanders. After the cloves have been put in all round the fruit, it is rolled in an orris root and cinnamon mixture.  Orris root is a ground powder from the rhizomatous roots of Iris Florentina. Pomanders, with their pleasing scent, have long been a tradition at our house at Christmastide!
Tillie Tinkham, the seamstress mouse for the dolls at Corgyncombe, with clove in paw, explains to Emma how to make a delightful smelling clove orange! Tillie made the smaller clove orange several years ago.
Emma is a doll inspired by the old Izannah Walker dolls.
September 25th, 2017 would have been Izannah Walker's 200th birthday.



December Moon over Corgyncombe
In Eleanor Farjeon's poem "The Clove Orange", she speaks of selecting "a small orange as round as the moon is, ..."




Corgyncombe's "Emily & Ethlyn's Potions & Perfumery", where lavender, rose, and clove oranges are favored fragrances. According to the "American Dictionary of The English Language" by Noah Webster, 1828, a potion is: a draught; usually, a liquid medicine; a dose.

Making Dundee cakes for tea is another tradition around Christmas time at Corgyncombe Cottage.
During the days before Christmas, delicious and festive Dundee cakes are enjoyed at tea time.
At the Corgyncombe Bakery I make many Dundee cakes in all different shapes and sizes.
 Dundee cakes are made a month ahead of time and put in cold storage until time for St. Nicholas Tea.

The receipt for Dundee Cake is in "The Tasha Tudor Cookbook".
I never add the citron nor the raisins as called for in the receipt, but add more than the called for amount of currants and in addition to the almonds in the receipt, add walnuts.
This combination makes the most delicious Dundee cake!

In her cookbook Tasha Tudor says to decorate the top of the Dundee cake with cherries and almonds. I have always decorated my Dundee cakes in a different pattern than those that I have seen Tasha illustrate. I use the cherry as the center with almonds or other nuts around the cherries forming flower-like shapes. I also use the currants to decorate the top of the Dundee cake.


Oranges, lemons, and cider for making wassail.

Miniature sized fruit and a clove orange pomander.

863 Park Avenue where Tillie has her shoppe "Tillie Tinkham's Frocks & Fashions" with Millinery and Tea Room.
Nearby the dollhouse is our old fashioned table top Christmas tree like my Grandmum always had! The tree is surrounded by an old fashioned fence; it looks like a park in the distance from the house. In front of the dollhouse are little trees and another fence.
The address 863 Park Avenue is above the door.
The dollhouse, with its two large opening doors, reminds us of Beatrix Potter's doll's house at Hill Top.


 The dollhouse was from the Parsons family's stone summer home at their estate in Connecticut. The dollhouse is a miniature version of 863 Park Avenue in Manhattan where the Parsons family had lived at one time.

Tillie has a millinery shoppe and tea room at 863 Park Avenue. Tillie is helping the little dog decide on a hat. Trying on hats, what fun!


The blue and silver scenes on the walls are like diamond shaped windows looking out to fashionable folk walking about on cobbled streets. The rows of close buildings with their steep roofs and chimneys are reminiscent of the charming old English villages Lacock and Bibury in the Cotswolds.

This Regency lady is charmingly similar to Cassandra's portrait of her sister Jane Austen.


Hitty pours herself another cup of tea at "Tillie Tinkham's Frocks and Fashions" with Millinery and Tea Room at 863 Park Avenue. Tillie balances on her rose tuffet and sips her tea.





Silent Night at Corgyncombe

We hope all our Dear Readers
had a wonderful Christmas!


Some of the photographs and some of the writings on this post are from previous Corgyncombe Courant posts that can be found here on the Corgyncombe Courant and from our web site and our previous postings elsewhere on the internet.

Please do not "Pin" our photographs.
Please do not post our photographs on facebook.


Our email:
atthecottagegate@yahoo.com
If you receive an email you think is from me from this email, please make sure it is atthecottagegate@yahoo.com, and not just something that sounds similar.


Photographs, images, and text copyright © 2000-2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson. All rights reserved. Photographs, images, and/or text may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson.


http://corgyncombecourant.blogspot.com/2017/12/clove-orange-pomanders.html
copyright © 2017 Diane Shepard Johnson and Sarah E. Johnson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~